Anti Inflammatory Horse Medications Over the Counter

The non steroidal anti inflammatory medications are given to a gathering that is identified with cortisone. They are regularly called NS aids.

Understand that NS-aids create their pain relieving activity by diminishing the aggravation. The news you don’t prefer to hear is that it can cover the real issue. On the possibility that the horse has harm to the joint surface, this may permit the owner or trainer to continue utilizing the horse which may show that you can harm the horse for ever!

One of the notable in SS-helps are the aspirin medicine. Aspirin can be utilized as a part of horses as it’s utilized as a part of people. Horse aspirin are huge pills, simple to smash and frequently exceptionally viable. Aspirin is a standout among the most agreeable medication as it is over the counter and frequently deals with an intense indication.

Obviously you generally contact your veterinarian when things continue returning constantly. Aspirin can be utilized as a part of numerous creatures, not in cats (by the way), with constant and serious issues with no side effects reported. Frequently horse owners utilize it when their horse is determined to have a hoof lameness, however the more you utilize it, the more inadequate, it will be, and again your veterinarian is your pioneer in this circumstance.

Digging into the hoof lameness illness which is a dynamic, hopeless issue, there are certain approaches to make it simple on the horse. At the point when a horse is determined to have this issue make a point to have a nearby contact between the farrier and the veterinarian, as they can have a colossal effect in the horse, counter treat with a brilliant result and a horse that keeps dynamic at all time.

Try not to place it in a stable and allow the horse to stand and doing nothing, turn the horse out and ensure that it’s walking and continues being exercised as much as could reasonably be expected. When you are in uncertainty about the hoof lameness infection, request that your farrier apply the hoot analyzer.

It’s an extremely valuable device, as though you begin testing the typical foot and place approximately strain on the foot with the foot analyzer, when sound no response will be given. By setting off to the issue foot you will experience a beyond any doubt and clear response to the pressure gave by the farrier. The hoof tester will likewise discover punctures, corns, sole abscesses and progressively on the possibility that they’re.

The pulling back of the hoof is to let you know that there is an issue. Begin with a little measure of weight and gradually work your way up in pushing power. However, there is dependably an exemption, as when the horse has been in a stuffed wet and messy territory the soles may be delicate and furnish you with a false answer and vise versa is the same for the foot that is to a great degree dry.

Tapping the sole with a little hammer might be more viable to scan for a reasonable reply. When you have convinced the foot test with the analyzer and nothing shows up, in any case, the horse unmistakably hints being lame, has gone onto the trial of flexion the joints in the influenced combine of hoof. Flexion may give you a reply as it alludes to bowing the joint as it normally twist or flexes.

A flexion test on any joint or set of joints are done keeping in mind the end goal to stretch the joint, the hard and the delicate tissue around. The response to all the previously mentioned issues that can happen regardless of the level or quality and breeding lines of the horse is to make a point to create an extraordinary relationship with your certified farrier and licensed veterinarian.

Riding on the Road: Safety First

I live on a large farm with a lot of land, but even so, I like to trail ride out on the road. Some people have never had this cool experience before, and many find it strange, but it is actually a lot of fun! Where I live, there are many, many, miles of country back roads, and the amount of cars coming by are not bountiful, we are lucky to get six in one hour. These are the best kind of roads to ride on, you definitely do not want to be on a public road with cars whizzing by every few seconds… safety FIRST!!!

If you take your horse to shows, he is probably used to noise, vehicles, and a variety of sights, but he may not necessarily be used to the idea of a car passing in close proximity to him on a road, or zooming by; most people slow down when they see a horse and rider out on the road, but not all do, and these are the ignorant people that you have to watch out for. Some people think it is cute or funny to honk their horn as they pass you and your horse on the road; as riders, we know that there is no humor in this situation; it is extremely dangerous. A startled horse has a tendency to run or act up, and you must be prepared to cope with the situation.

As I train my young horses, I ride them on the road to desensitize them, but only after I know that they are far enough along that they will listen to me if something happens to scare them. I train them to ride out on the road, as I know that they will be ridden on the road in the future. But, if you have an older already trained horse, and you want to make him comfortable on the road, lead him out there for a couple hours a day and let him graze along the road. As cars pass, see how he reacts. Even if he is eating, how he reacts to cars while on the roadside grazing will give you almost a perfect example of how he will react when being ridden. I also advise that he not startle and spook easily, as some people who do not know better WILL honk their car horns as they go by and alarm your horse. Do some spook training with him on noises BEFORE riding or leading him on the road.

Gear for road-riding will be slightly different than for regular riding. For you, it would be wise to wear a body protector, a reflective vest, and a helmet, along with your regular riding gear (jeans or breeches, boots, maybe chaps or half-chaps, a riding friendly shirt, and gloves). A spill while riding on the asphalt is definitely going to cause more damage than an accident in the field or arena, and you don’t want any injuries that CAN be prevented. For your horse, you may wrap his legs or put tendon/brushing boots on him, outfit him in bell boots, or use knee protection, all to keep him safe should he slip or fall.

After he is used to cars, take him out for a short hack and see how he does. Always watch AND listen for oncoming cars. Coming around a turn, a car will most likely not see you. I advise staying on the outside shoulder of the road when encompassing a long turn that you cannot see around, going against the flow of traffic. If you horse does well riding on the road quietly, does, you can go for a longer ride each time, until you are riding to a friend’s house if you want to!

As you go though, please remember to keep an eye and ear open for cars so that YOU are aware of approaching traffic even if your horse is not. In most cases, the horse will hear the traffic even before you do, and flick his ears and listen as it comes. If he happens to spook because of a loud engine or horn, sit calmly, and relax yourself as much as possible to let him know that it was just a noise; most times, the horse may jump forward a few steps, but once he realizes that you are unafraid, he will settle to just flicking his ears around, and then becoming placid as his usual self once again.

Starting Out With a New Hanoverian Sport Horse

The Hanoverian horse has been a consistently popular breed of sport horse for a long time, and for good reason. Hanoverian horses are incredibly lithe, agile and sportive. Hanoverians are renowned for their good temperaments, which makes them easy to train to a great extent. These horses are also highly intelligent and generally form very harmonious relationships with their riders. Hanoverian sport horses are famed worldwide for their awe-inspiring grace and beauty – they possess an infallible combination of muscular limbs, a robust body and an enduringly strong back. Any horse lover, or potential investor in a sport horse would truly be wise to choose a Hanoverian sport horse.

Hanoverian sport horses can be seen at all levels of competitive games, from local horse shows to the Olympic games. In fact, statistics show that the Hanoverian breed is the most successful of all warm blood horse breeds – not surprising when their athleticism and excellent temperament are acknowledged.

Question: I have invested in a fantastic Hanoverian Sport Horse. What is my next step?

First of all, congratulations on your successful investment in a Hanoverian, anyone who has the pleasure of owning one of these horses is guaranteed many years of satisfaction and enjoyment from seeing their horse continually succeed. However, their success does not come automatically. The most important first step to take, once you have purchased your horse, is to organize its training.

High quality training with an experienced trainer is imperative to guarantee your horse’s success in competitive games. It is recommended to conduct ample research on the type of training you wish your horse to receive. Training based on classical teaching principles has proven widely popular. In many cases, the classical teaching principles are applied during training, while the trainer simultaneously forms a specific program based on the unique needs of the horse undergoing training, taking their personality traits and physical strengths into close consideration.

When researching and deciding on the right horse trainer for your Hanoverian horse’s needs, inquire as to the success levels in competitive games of horses that have been previously undergone training with them. This will give you a fair idea of how well the trainer works with horses and caters to their individual needs. It is also very important to introduce your horse to the trainer, and even allow them to take the horse for a ride to gauge how they collaborate with one another. Additionally, it is just as important for you, the horse owner to mesh well with the chosen trainer.

Hanoverian horses are highly intelligent and if they sense any weakness, their training may not be as successful as it could be. In the long run, it is extremely important that your Hanoverian, you and your trainer all connect well to ensure your horse’s maximum success.

What You Need to Know About Riding Your Horse Bareback

This seems to be a much debated topic. There is an even divide in response; some people say yes, and some people say no. They think that it hurts the horse, or that it is not natural because the rider’s weight is not distributed as evenly as it is in a saddle. I say, it depends; on the horse and on the rider. Is your horse bony-backed? Are you an especially thin person? If so, you should not ride your horse bareback; horses have extremely sensitive skin and can feel things very harshly. You would dig into his back muscles and cause his back to be tender so that you could not ride him for several days. Riding bones on bones does not mix. A large rider on a narrow or bony horse is also not a good idea; it will put too much pressure on one area of the horse’s back; thus causing the same problem: a sore horse. Fattening the horse up will probably not work, some horses, like some people, are just built very slender and there is nothing to do about it.

Another factor is your seat. How do you sit on the horse? Is your weight always in one area, or are you bouncing around? Do you move with the horse, or clamp your legs against his sides in an effort to stay on and stay still? If you sit stiffly on the horse, with your weight all in one area, it can be very uncomfortable for your horse and he will not ride well. His gaits will be stiff and make your ride difficult. Do not clamp your legs on the horse either, he may take this as a response to move faster and while you try to stop him, he will get confused thinking that he is being told to go faster. This all factors into whether you should ride bareback or not. I was raised riding bareback first, most people are taught in the saddle first, and so while I find it easy, comfortable, and relaxing to ride bareback, you may not.

Develop an independent seat. Feel as comfortable riding bareback as you do with a saddle, and always, no matter what, start out at the walk until you feel secure and then you may move up to faster gaits. Do not ride at faster gaits until you are certain that you are able to; if you fall off, you may lose your confidence all together. If you decide to trot, start out at a slow trot, and if you feel good about it, and comfortable doing it, go faster. The most important thing to remember while riding bareback is: move with the horse. If you had to carry something heavy around on your back, would you rather it stay stiff and hard on your back, or move pliably with you as if it were part of you? Of course you would want it to move with you, so do the same with your horse. Make his load easier by not being a burden.

Building a Fence for a Horse Riding Arena

For our new horse riding arena we chose to build a full perimeter fence. This will be consisting of wood posts and boards that would match our out buildings and horse sheds. We used 8 inch posts, and 2 x 6 boards 16 feet long. Our posts were spaced 8 feet apart, this enabled us to fasten each 2 x 6 board to three posts. This was to reduce the chance of the 2 x 6 boards warping and twisting, as well as making the fence stronger. The position of all the posts, including gateways were staked out prior to constructing the arena fence. Our arena will be 200 x 100 feet, with a 12 foot gate at each end. We began by tying a string to a corner stake and pulling it 200 feet to the next corner stake on the long side of the arena. After pulling the string tight to ensure that it was a perfectly straight-line, we tied it tightly to the second stake. A stake for each post was then placed along the string line at 8 foot intervals to complete the first side of our perimeter fence.

To layout the second side of our riding arena fence we measured 100 feet from the corner stake and put a stake in the ground for the next corner. To make sure that the corners are perfect 90? angles. We could have used a construction calculator to do the math. Instead we made our own 90 degree angle with, a known math solution, the old tried and tested method of the 3, 4, 5 right-triangle solution. A triangle that has three sides where one is 3 feet long, another is 4 feet and the third leg is 5 feet long creates a right triangle. The intersection of the 3 foot and 4 foot leg create a perfect 90 degree angle. Any multiples of these dimensions also work; 6, 8, 10 or 12, 16, and 20 are also combinations that yield a perfect 90 degree angle. To make our corner, we used a measurement of 100 feet to the next corner, 75 feet back down our staked fence line, and 125 feet for our diagonal measurement. Where the 100 foot measurement, and the 125 foot measurement intersected we placed our next corner stake. After pulling a string to make sure of a straight-line, we placed 11 stakes at 8 foot intervals along the string. This made a total distance of 88 feet. The remaining 12 feet is where our gate went. We chose to use a 12 foot gate at each end of our arena for two reasons. First this is a good-sized opening for getting machinery into the arena to maintain the riding surface. And secondly, 12 feet gave us an even measurement for our 8 foot post spacing on the 100 foot side of the arena.

To layout and stake the third side of our arena perimeter fence, we measured 200 feet and placed the last corner stake, taking care to have perfect 90? angles on our corners using the 3, 4, 5 right-triangle solution. After pulling a straight string line we placed our post stakes every 8 feet completing the layout of the third side. We laid out the last side of the arena with 11 stakes spaced 8 feet apart for the posts and another 12 foot opening for a gate.

After all of the perimeter post positions had been staked, we used a post hole digger on a machine to drill the holes in the ground for our posts. Our posts were 8 feet long, and our holes were drilled 2 feet deep, so that we would have 6 feet of post sticking out of the ground when finished. We used a string line and level to make sure all of our posts were straight and uniform before tamping and watering the ground around them for compaction.

When all of the perimeter posts had been tamped into place, we then began fastening our 2 x 6 boards to the posts for the railings. We chose to use two railings one at 30 inches to the top, and another at 60 inches to the top of railing. Before fastening the railings to the posts, we pulled a string line tightly down the row of posts at 30 inches high and made a mark on each post were the top of the bottom railing will be, we also made another mark at 60 inches for the top of the top rail. Next we used clamps to clamp our 2 x 6 railing to the posts taking care to line up with our mark, we had made previously. The railings will be attached to the posts using 5/16 by 3 inch long lag bolts with a large flat washer. To do this, we first drilled two holes slightly smaller than 5/16 through the railing and into the post. We chose to use two bolts to fasten our railings to each post, therefore the two bolt holes were drilled in the railings 1 1/2 inches from the edge of the 2 x 6. We did not want our bolt heads to protrude out of the railing, so we drilled the two holes in the railing slightly larger than the washer 1/2″ deep to countersink the washer and head of the lag bolt. After inserting the bolts into the holes and tightening them up, the clamps were then removed and the process was repeated for the next railing.

After attaching all of the railings to the posts, we then hung the two 12 foot gates on each end of our riding arena. We purchased two steel gate kits that came with hinges and a latch on them ready for installation. To hang the gates was a simple matter of drilling two holes through the gateposts at the correct height. The final step to completing our riding arena was to paint all of the wood railings and posts with a good outdoor protective paint that would preserve and protect the wood, as well as matching the color on our existing horse sheds.

Keeping Your Horse Happy In the Heat

I don’t know about you but so far Spring in Los Angeles has been pretty hot. It’s been reaching almost 90 degrees (Fahrenheit) in some parts of the city. The heat not only affects us but it affects our horses (and all our other animals).

Here are some simple ways to keep your horse happy and healthy during a heat wave.

  1. Water – Always make sure you have plenty of water available for your horse at all times. Keep an eye out for bugs and mosquitoes. Not unlike us horses are less likely to want to drink if there are a bunch of bugs in the water. It is also safer for them to drink clean water.
  2. Shade – Have a large enough area of shade for your horse to relax in when it starts to get too hot. No one likes to bake in the sun all day.
  3. Electrolytes – Horses lose electrolytes while they sweat. Replenish salt loss during excessive sweating with a suitable electrolyte supplement. They have them available at most places where you get your horse feed.
  4. Ventilation – When possible, leave barn doors and windows open and install misting fans near each stall if you can. Keep a hose near by for a quick splash.
  5. Baths – Bathe your horse! He/She will love you for it. Nothing feels better then having a nice cold bath on a hot day.
  6. Coat Care – Keep your horse’s mane and tail trimmed. Apply a zinc oxide sunscreen to pink noses to help prevent sunburn. There are shampoos available with UV protection added to help protect your horse’s coat. Horses can get sunburn too. It’s not just for us.

These tips will help keep your and your horse happy during the spring heat wave. Not only will they be happy but they will be healthy. Many of times we can’t tell when our animals are suffering, especially during the hotter times of the year. If we keep up with all the items listed below then you are more then likely to have a happy and healthy horse. Horses can suffer from heat stroke just like any human can. Only we can speak up for ourselves. For more information on how to keep your horse happy you can always look to Google. Information is limitless on the internet and it never hurts to do your research when it comes to those you love.

Handling Your Horse’s Hooves Safely

Starting out

Just because a horse refuses to lift its feet for you it does not always mean that it is being disobedient. For a horse to lift its feet, it must be taught how. The best time to train your horse is when it is still a foal, but if you are handling an adult horse do not assume that it knows how to lift its feet, as this training may have been missed. As cleaning hooves is an essential part of horse care, you need to teach your horse how to willingly lift its feet when asked.

Make It Rewarding!

Positive reinforcement, as well as consistent practise, is the most effective method in teaching any new behaviours or developing existing ones. Learning the right timingis essential if you want to teach your horse to pick up their feet easily when asked.

Initially, make sure to give the reward after a few seconds of picking up their feet for the horse to understand the process. After the horse is responding easily, you can make it longer between positive reinforcement actions.

You can choose any sound you want to prompt the foot being picked up as long as that sound does not startle the horse. However, it is best to just pick one sound and then stick with it. For example, you can choose to say “pick it up”, you can snap your fingers, whistle or cluck your tongue. Choose a sound that you can easily create and remember. Make the sound immediately before touching to pick up the foot. The sound draws your horse’s attention as well as allows it to associate the sound to whatever it is doing.

The rewards or positive reinforcement can be anything that your horse likes or enjoys. You can provide food such as horse cookies, carrot chunks, mints, bits of grain, or wisp of hay, though these may cause your horse to fidget if you don’t have the treats with you at some time in the future. You can also scratch its withers, a definite winner with most horses,or pat its neck and praise them.

Safety without Stress

You need to consider your safety and your horse’s happiness when caring for your horse’s feet. Below are some steps so you can care for your horse’s feet effectively, safely as well as stress free for both you and your horse.

1. No surprises – Make sure your horse is aware of your presence. Walk towards your horse in its line of sight and talk to your horse while approaching. Do not position yourself behind your horse since you put yourself at risk of being kicked. Position yourself beside your horse’s shoulder about two feet out. While talking, pet your horse’s neck and slide your hand down from its shoulder to its leg. This allows you to check the tendon area for any issues.

2. Just above your horse’s ankle, with your thumb close to your hand, grasp your horse’s leg at the back and tell it to “pick it up” or use the signal you decided on above. The horse will immediately comply if it’s used to lifting its feet upon your command.

3. If it doesn’t; you can lean into the shoulder with your hip to take the weight off the foot, while squeezing in your thumb and forefinger and asking it to lift its foot until it complies. Always state what you want and reward it when it complies. In time, your horse will lift its foot up himself when you tell it.

4. Move a bit closer and be careful not to move your feet under your horse’s feet. Move your hand gently down to grasp the foot and then flex the ankle slowly. This will allow you to view the sole as well as have complete control over your horse’s leg.

5. As you’re holding the foot of your horse with your one hand, use your other hand to use the hoof pick. A cheap hoof pick is normally just as effective as an expensive one. Make sure the hoof pick is fairly blunt as this reduces the risk of wounding your horse.

6. Insert the point of the pick inside the heel bulb next to the frog and run it down from one side of the frog to the other, from heel to toe in order to remove the caked debris. Gently clean the cleft in the frog’s centre, where a horse with a chronic thrush may be tender and sore. Pull off any loose pieces of frog skin that will come off by hand, but make sure not to tear anything that’s not already loose.

7. Lastly, arc the hoof pick around the shoe’s interior rim to remove anything that is clinging. Put your horse’s foot down and transfer the hoof pick in your pocket or somewhere easily accessible.

8. Next would be to work on your horse’s hind legs. Let your horse know that you are approaching its hind leg by patting its shoulder and running your hand along its side. Talk to your horse while moving and stay close while you position yourself beside its hindquarter.

9. Just like what you did in the earlier steps, lean into your horse as you bend down while keeping your feet out from under its feet. Using your elbow and forearm is not only for establishing contact, they allow you to easily push away if ever you sense your horse preparing to kick.

10. Lifting the hind foot is where you need to have the most control as this is where you are at the highest risk of being kicked. To be out of harm’s way, you need to position yourself in a way that your shoulders are roughly parallel to the horse’s hip bone with your head out of the line of fire. Move your hand down until you are slightly above the top of the ankle. Tell your horse to “pick it up” or use your chosen signal while giving a slight squeeze. If your horse does not respond right away, reinforce your message by pulling the ankle forward and up toward the front of the horse.

11. If your horse threatens to lift their leg before you ask, or appears to be threatening to kick you, hold the tail in one hand while you are reaching down to lift the leg. You can gently pull on the tail to over balance them and get them to think twice about lifting feet when not asked to.

How to Get and Keep Your Horse in Top Shape and Ready for Anything

The first thing you need to understand is that your horse is just like any other athlete. And just like an athlete, you cannot expect it to perform like an Olympian right off the bat if it has been parked in a stall for months on end, or if it has been lazily grazing in the fields. In our culture, horses have been romanticized in books and movies as creatures of unlimited power and capability. It is often just assumed that they are born with and always maintain the ability to carry a rider for miles upon miles at a full run. But the truth is that a horse must be carefully and methodically trained to perform at top levels, it is not something they are just born being able to do.

Just like you could not expect yourself to be able to run a marathon tomorrow if you had spent the last six months on the sofa with a bag of chips. So, before you start making high demands of your steed, you need to do for your horse what any good trainer would do for his athlete. You need to condition it.

Your horse’s age and the amount of work it has previously done, if any, will determine where you need to start as well as what you want him in shape for. Remember, you can injure a horse by taking him out of the stall or pasture and immediately start riding him if he has had little or no riding time in weeks or months. A horse that gets ridden once or twice a week needs a gradual training program that starts out with a half hour ride every other day-this ride does not need to be hard, simply walking for one or two miles a day is a good way to start out when conditioning any horse that has not been ridden very much previously. You want to do this walking for a couple miles about every other day for at least two weeks, then you can work up to a trot for a minute or so in between long periods of walking during your ride. This is similar to what athletes call “interval training.” The horse needs restricted to these slow paces; if he is not accustomed to being ridden often, you will injure him by trying to make him move at a pace that he is not capable of moving at. For two weeks you will want to do these walk/trot intervals as you ride, just to get him used to a riding schedule again. Then, you may build up to a canter; but again, no long canter periods, you must canter for just a few seconds and then have several walk/trot intervals, then take another canter. After about six weeks of this cumulative work, when the horse is used to being ridden for a good solid hour or more, you may begin more strenuous work, such as riding uphill and downhill at the trot and then gradually to the canter-riding downhill at the trot will improve your horse’s and your own balance-and the toughest part of the training program begins.

Once your horse is in great shape and is conditioned for more strenuous work, you can begin to train your horse for whatever specific task you want. I.e. jumping, dressage, barrel racing, cross country, etc.

All of these sports demand that your horse be in top shape before beginning to train for them. Thinking that you can just skip the conditioning and move right into the specific training is very dangerous and counterproductive. The idea that your horse will just get conditioned as it goes is a recipe for serious and even permanent injury to your horse. Do not risk your horse’s health or your safety in an attempt to speed up the process.

Once conditioned, you will want to find a good source of instruction in your particular discipline. While you are looking, here are a few things that you can do you get started.

If you are jumping you want to start out trotting over poles on the ground, then trotting over small jumps spaced a couple feet apart (a good rule of thumb is usually about four feet apart, but you may need to adjust it depending on your horse’s stride), and finally going over small jumps building up to whatever height jump you and your horse are ready for. You must always start out conditioning slowly or you can injure the horse to the point where it cannot be ridden anymore. Conditioning the barrel racer would involve setting up three barrels and trotting in the pattern around them, gradually building up to faster speeds. As you can see, any particular sport that you may want your horse conditioned for can be achieved pretty easily once the foundation for strength-building has been laid. Start out slowly when conditioning any horse. If you are not sure how to go about it, it is always better to ask an experienced horse person than to take unnecessary chances. You will find that most experienced horsemen are more than happy to help and offer advice.

Beginners Basic Guide – How to Choose and Care for Your Horse

The first step would be to ensure that you have somewhere to keep your new pet. Whether you own property, or rent pasture, the ideal area where your horse will stay needs to be secured with fencing. The area should be at least a couple acres with some sort of shelter such as a barn or lean too. You should always do a walk through of the pasture before releasing your pet. Remove anything that could pose a danger to your horse such as garbage, poisonous plants, old fencing, dead trees etc.

After deciding where you will be keeping your horse you will need to actually choose a horse that is compatible with yourself and your family. Do not be afraid to ask potential sellers or adopters a variety of questions such as, the history and age of the horse and make sure you take advantage of this time by addressing any potential health or behavioral issues.

Visually Check the horse over well, including lifting the hooves to make sure that they are rounded properly, crack free and have been trimmed and taken care of. You will want to pay particular attention to the frog of the hoof, as this area is an important part. If the frog of the hoof is damaged it can cause issues when riding such as limping, lameness and further damage.

You can judge the approximate age of a horse by lifting the upper lip to look at the way the teeth have worn and the way that they line up. After the age of fifteen the upper teeth will start to overlap the bottom teeth. A horse under ten will have perfectly aligned teeth, where the upper teeth sit right on top of the lower teeth.

If you plan on riding your pet, then you will want to bring your preferred saddle along with you when meeting the horse. After asking relevant questions, you should test drive the horse to make sure that it is the one for you.

It is a good idea to check out more than one horse and familiarize yourself with each potential pet. You should plan on spending a little bit of time with each animal so that you can watch their actions and reactions.The more you know about the horse the better chance you have of choosing the perfect pet.

Horses require a lot of time and care. The basics of caring for your pet are proper food, water and shelter. Your pet will also need to have their feet trimmed regularly as well as being wormed every three months and yearly vaccinations.On occasion your horses teeth will need to be floated.These animals can be costly to own and they are a long- term investment, so you will want to choose wisely.

Choosing a Winning Barrel Racing Futurity Prospect

When selecting a barrel racing futurity prospect, the first thing I consider is the horse’s pedigree. Are the bloodlines in the prospect’s pedigree statistically proven to win in futurity competitions? The sire with the most winning futurity horses is Dash Ta Fame. There are horses sired by Dash Ta Fame that have not won and there are horses not sired by him that have won, but statistically his offspring perform better, and I prefer to stack the odds in my favor. Most people are misinformed to think that an average mare can produce an outstanding foal if bred to an outstanding stallion. I disagree. The truly phenomenal horses, come from outstanding mares, therefore, I heavily weigh the dam’s side of the pedigree. I consider whether she was a great performer herself, or if any of her previous foals have performed well. Both sides of the pedigree should be able to stand on the own merit, and should not be used to compensate each other.

Next, I study the prospect’s conformation, how its body is built. There are specific attributes that better equip barrel horses to perform their jobs. I look for a big, round, dark, “soft,” kind-looking eye. An eye with this appearance signifies intelligence. I want a nice slope to the shoulder, a steep shoulder indicates a short stride without much reach. That being said, the angle of the shoulder and the hip should match, indicating the horse will be able to collect effectively in training. Moving down from the hip to the hocks, I prefer a lower hock set to a higher one. This allows a horse to get underneath itself for the turn, and should be powerful pushing off with its hind end. Moving further down to the pasterns, I look for a well-balanced pastern. Too long and the horse will be more prone to injuries, too short and the horse’s stride will be hampered. The overall legs should not be too finely boned, as this will lend the horse towards more injuries. I also study the back and underline. I prefer a short back and long underline. This indicates speed and agility. I do not consider height too much when selecting a prospect. There is not a perfect size for winning. I have seen pro horses winning that are anywhere between 14- 17 hands. I prefer mine to be between 15.0-15.3, but that is a personal preference. Short horses can be just as fast as the tall horses if they have the conformation to do so. That is what is important. Barrel racing, especially futurities, asks a lot of the horses’ bodies. Selecting a prospect that is naturally better equipped to perform the task will only give you an advantage in the arena, as well as aid in preventing injuries.

There are advantages and disadvantages to selecting your prospect from the race track. The disadvantages could be endless if you do not buy from a reputable trainer. The horse could already have soundness issues. It could be mentally pushed too hard, therefore will be unable to adapt to barrel training. They could be infusing the horse with illegal substances. These instances, unfortunately, do happen at race tracks, but can be avoided if you know where you should be purchasing. If you buy from a reputable trainer, the advantages include that the horse has already been taught to run. Some people see babies out in the pasture with their moms frolicking around and assume horses naturally know how to run. This is not the case. Horses have no idea how to run at the speed needed for competition and must be trained to do so. When they come from the track, you do not have to include that in your barrel training. Another advantage is that they have already been exposed to the newness of hauling and travelling to new places. Track horses are well seasoned, whereas horses that have not been to the track must slowly adjust to the experiences of hauling.